Announcing: International Girl Gang Underground Zine Release

In light of this week’s 100th International Women’s Day, Kate Wadkins (of For the Birds Collective, Brain Waves) and Stacy Konkiel (of Soul Ponies) announce the International Girl Gang Underground (IGGU) zine, which is now available in print and online. In an effort to highlight contemporary D.I.Y. feminist cultural production, twenty years after the riot grrrl movement, and in the wake of its legacy, the editors collected stories, artwork, and critical work on the subject.

The print zine features contributions from Osa Atoe (Shotgun Seamstress), Hadass Ben-Ari (Fallopian Falafel – אשת חיל), Carla Duarte (Histérica), Billy Cheer (This is Fag City), Katie Crutchfield (P.S. Eliot, Bad Banana), Lo (HEARTSREVOLUTION), Mimi Thi Nguyen (Evolution of a Race Riot, Punk Planet), and thirteen other writers, activists, musicians, and artists from ten US states and five countries; with original cover art by Philadelphia-based artist Sonrisa Rodriguez-Harrison.

Online, International Girl Gang Underground has published exclusive articles not available in the print zine. In the interest of relevance, information-sharing, and community-building, IGGU online has created a directory of feminist cultural projects; all are welcome to submit new or recent additions to the directory. Further, the editors encourage submissions of music reviews and content related to the zine to be released on the IGGU website periodically. We hope to continue these conversations online.

In Brooklyn, New York, the zine will be released on Saturday, March 12th, 2011 at Death by Audio:

INTERNATIONAL GIRL GANG UNDERGROUND ZINE RELEASE PARTY
GIRL GANG GIG VOLUME #003

$6 | 8PM | ALL AGES

featuring:

SLINGSHOT DAKOTA

BAD BANANA

AYE NAKO

AMERICAN SUN

+ readings from contributors of the International Girl Gang Underground zine & tabling by FOR THE BIRDS and SUPPORT NEW YORK. This event will be a safer space, with support from NYC Coalition for Safer Spaces.

@ Death by Audio
49 S. 2nd Street, b/w Kent & Wythe
Brooklyn, NY 11211
L to Bedford | JMZ to Marcy | G to Broadway

RSVP on Facebook.

The print zine is now available for purchase through the IGGU website. For further information, see GIRLGANGUNDERGROUND.ORG or contact the editors at GIRLGANGUNDERGROUND@GMAIL.COM.

With love and solidarity,
Kate Wadkins & Stacy Konkiel

Brain Waves: New Zine & Print Collection

Kate Wadkins at Storefront Gallery.

Congratulations to R/V Web Editor Kate Wadkins for her recent opening of “Brain Waves” zine and print collection at Bushwick’s Storefront Gallery in Brooklyn.  As curator of the collection, Kate was featured in the Greenpoint Gazette last Thursday. Be sure to check out the article, “Riding the Brainwaves” by Jesse Sposato here.  Here is an excerpt:

Kate Wadkins, Storefront gallery manager and now Brain Waves curator, has been involved in zine culture since she was a teenager, and she continued to celebrate this pastime last Friday, January 28 with the opening of Brain Waves, Storefront’s zine and print collection. Storefront, which just celebrated its one-year-anniversary, was a triple threat on Friday. In conjunction with the Brain Waves opening, there was also Mary Judge’s solo show, Pop-Oculus that took place in the front room, and Wavelength, a group show in the back featuring works by Judith Braun, Maureen McQuillan and Susanna Starr. “[Wavelength] was kind of part of the impetus of having Brain Waves open at the same time. We just thought it was too much of a coincidence to have Wavelength and Brain Waves [open simultaneously],” Wadkins said.

Wadkins, along with Storefront founders and directors Jason Andrew and Deborah Brown, is using Brain Waves as yet another platform for artists within the space. “It [is] a really good opportunity for me to be able to tap into all the things that I [see] going on and give people just one other way to get their work out there,” Wadkins said. The collection is going to be rotating and the goal, as of now, is to have a new zine every month with a corresponding opening.

Given the nature of zine and small press culture, some of the editions have pretty small runs so they will be continually replaced, making the rotation process virtually effortless. “I think it’s going to be a pretty healthy turnover just because we already had a bunch of sales in the first week,” Wadkins said optimistically.

For now, the collection consists of mostly zines, but while they’re all considered “zines” technically, each one is wildly different from the next. Some are literary zines, and others, that have been printed via silkscreen or linoleum cuts, strongly resemble artist books. As well, they currently have several pieces up that fall into the “prints and other ephemera” section, a category they would like to eventually build up further. Lauren Denitzio’s “One Chapter in the Book” is a full-sized print, and Aimee Lusty has silk-screened “Beach or Bust” totes.


Be sure to read the rest in the Greenpoint Gazette.

–Rosamund Hunter

Queering Categories, Bringing Wreck

illustration by Cristy Road

by Kate Wadkins

In sync with Sarah Lawrence’s recent call for papers for 2011’s Women’s History Conference, I am syndicating my review of the plenary panel from this year’s The Message is in the Music: Hip Hop Feminism, Riot Grrrl, Latina Music & More with RE/VISIONIST (it is also currently published in this year’s Women’s History newsletter). Specifically Ngo and Nguyen’s papers, in the context of the Conference at large, really inspired me to pursue my thesis work on masculinities in punk rock. Watching other scholars dare to take on pop culture subjects like music gave me hope and certainty that cultural production is worthy of an historical treatment.

This article is also timely as it preempts the publication of International Girl Gang Underground, a compilation zine about the way riot grrrl has influenced punk feminist cultural production over the past twenty years. Nguyen’s early iteration of her paper, “Aesthetics, Access, Intimacy” or “Race, Riot Grrrl, Bad Feelings” will be included in the zine, nestled in among scene reports and personal stories from all over the world.

“I quit punk like 8 times,” Mimi Nguyen confessed to a full auditorium at Sarah Lawrence College’s 12th Annual Women’s History Conference: The Message is in the Music: Hip-Hop Feminism, Riot Grrrl, Latina Music & More, recollecting her contentious relationship with punk rock. As the first panel of the morning opened up, the groggy, packed audience, comprised of women of all ages and ilk, quickly awoke to Nguyen’s sharp wit and powerful presence. For the plenary panel, Fiona Ngo and Mimi Nguyen, both assistant professors at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, discussed grassroots punk scenes and their internal racial dynamics. A third panelist, Sarah Lawrence alum Christa D’Angelica, presented on what she termed a “second wave” of riot grrrl that traversed from zine[1] pages to dial-up modems in the late 1990s. Continue reading

For the Birds: The Worst, Issue 2

New York-based feminist collective For the Birds recently posted a blog about the release of The Worst, Issue 2, a compilation zine on grief and loss.  FTB member and zine author Kathleen wrote about the importance of grief processing as an “inherently feminist act.”  Here is an excerpt and be sure to check out the full piece at forthebirdscollective.org.

Why discuss grief processing on a feminist blog? For me, working towards an authentic, community-based model of grief processing is an inherently feminist act.  On a basic level, radical feminism seeks empowerment for those who are subjugated or harmed by the patriarchal capitalist mainstream.  As we are socialized into this system, we are often taught to suppress or contain our emotions and feelings lest we be labeled “hysterical,” “bitchy,” “weak,” or “too much.”  And yet, racism, sexism, homophobia, able-ism and other structural inequalities in our society justifiably invoke outrage in anyone who dares to expose or work against injustice.  We are told, as usual, that we cannot trust our own voices, feelings, and experiences of the everyday losses that those holding power in our society depend upon to maintain control.

Often, our reactions to the deaths of important people in our lives are forced into specific templates or time frames that don’t always reflect our true needs.  We may experience few instances of genuine support amidst the hospitals, Hallmark cards, and “Stages of Grief” we are supposedly moving through.  This repression and denial of grief inhibits authentic communications from occurring around the universal experience of loss and alienates us from one another during times when we may need other people the most.  To claim our grief—to claim that our relationships with each other matter–within this climate of isolation and denial is feminism in action.  Any method by which we can reclaim our authentic selves results in empowerment and creates a space for more of us at the collective table.

Read Kathleen’s full article here.

International Girl Gang Underground

As you may have guessed from this post, the intersections of grassroots feminisms and music are really important to me. As a woman musician, I find do-it-yourself modes of production in music, writing, art, and media in general crucial not only to my own creative control, but also to the circulation of marginalized and/or dissenting voices.

As a participant in feminist cultural production, I have been worried by the lack of documentation about what creative women are doing now. Continue reading

Interview with Photographer Logan White

by Rosamund Hunter

Logan White‘s photography subverts and complicates notions of gender as it relates to domesticity, sexual expression, power, and vulnerability.  Her images are consistently beautiful, quirky, and at times macabre. Logan first fell in love with photography at the age of thirteen at Camp Glen Arden in North Carolina and by fifteen had built her own darkroom.  After studying photography at Rhode Island School of Design and spending a year abroad on the European Honors Program in Rome, Italy, she worked as an independent photographer in both New York and Philadelphia.  Recently, Logan has exhibited at Spencer Brownstone Gallery in NYC, Wesleyan College for Women in Macon, GA, and Mercer University in honor of Women’s History Month, a show sponsored by the Women’s and Gender Studies department.

Logan is spending some time in her hometown of Macon, treating her stint there like a residency before moving to Los Angeles in May.  In LA, she’ll participate in a group show called “VOLUME” opening at AT1 Projects on May 21st from 6:00 – 10:00pm, followed by group shows in NYC at Milk Gallery and in Sydney, Australia at Monster Children Gallery, also in May.  You can soon see Logan’s latest series of photographs in TEST Magazine commissioned by Jaime Perlman, the Art Director of British Vogue and founder of TEST.  Be sure to check out Logan’s work online at her website, Logan White Photography, and on her blog, Psychic Sunset.  Her zine, “Divinity Lessons,” is available at Printed Matter in NYC.

Recently Roz, RE/VISIONIST staff member, had the opportunity to talk to Logan White about the roles gender and sexuality play in her images. Continue reading

Interview: Daniela Capistrano of POC Zine Project

by Kate Wadkins

Photo courtesy of Bashira Webb.

Say what you will about Twitter, but it brought Daniela Capistrano and I together. Daniela is a powerhouse working with media and culture in New York, while also being an activist, teacher, and the founder of POC Zine Project. As fellow RE/VISIONIST staffer Nydia Swaby and I began coordinating the non-profit tablers for this year’s Sarah Lawrence College Women’s History Conference, “The Message is in the Music,” we fell in love with POC Zine Project’s mission and invited them to join us. Daniela found some time to chat with me online so we could find out more about the project and her own experiences with activism and work.

RE/VISIONIST: Who are you and what do you do?

Daniela Capistrano: I’m Daniela Capistrano and I am a freelance multimedia producer currently gigging at MTV Tr3s as a Senior Producer and at Uncensored Interview as a shooter/producer/editor. I also crew on short films, music videos and other stuff. Continue reading